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Map to the Multiverse

Publication Details

cover

Map to the Multiverse
by Emma R. Wilson

graphic design by Charlie Huth and Kt Krekel

illustrattions by Jess Black

ISBN 978-0-9819591-7-7
© 2013

hand-sewn saddle-stictch binding
52 pages (5" X 6.5”)

$12.00 plus $2.50 postage

Bronze Man Books is pleased to announce the publication of Map to the Multiverse by Emma R. Wilson. This collection of poery is a hand-sewn chapbook featuring works that celebrate the movement and creativity of the imagination. "You sense in reading Emma R. Wilson's poems that almost anything can happen in them and be completely believable. They introduce a new kind of space-age, pop-culture carnivalesque." ~Stpehen Frech, introduction.

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Map to the Multiverse, by Emma R. Wilson, illustrated byJess Black. (Decatur, IL.): Bronze Man Books, 2012, 40 pages, 4 x 6, hand-sewn addle-stitch binding. ISBN 978-0-9819591-7-7. $12.00 and $2.50 postage from the publisher at <http://www.bronzemanbooks.com> or by mail from: Bronze Man Books, Millikin University, 1184 W. Main, Decatur, IL 62522.

Synopsis

Bronze Man Books is pleased to announce the publication of Map to the Multiverse by Emma R. Wilson. This collection of poery is a hand-sewn chapbook featuring works that celebrate the movement and creativity of the imagination.

Tiger, Tiger

The light glimmers and you feel
a seizure coming.
Panic pools in acorn wells
so faeries can harvest it for their gardens;
magical, tragical dew, made special, by you.

Your chest is a bundle of rubber bands,
your eyes aren’t for seeing anymore.
The small of your back screams
“Please! Let’s get out of here!”

Then, the faeries, with fire hair
may sneer and snicker,
taunting you as your vision begins to flicker
into kaleidoscopes.

“Focus on your center,” you recall your therapist advising.
“Hold tight to your core, and breathe.”

An excerpt from the introduction by Dr. Stephen Frech:

The “great and wild beyond” in Emma R. Wilson’s Map to the Multiverse appears alternately in front of and behind your eyelids. We do more than simply witness the other-worldly—we are the source of it, an essential link between the madcap worlds, dreams, altered realities, perhaps hyper-realities that weave this collection together.

The poem titles give a good indication of these locales: “The End of the World,” “Star Children,” “The Moon Girl,” “The Abyss,” “Consequences of Time Travel.” These poems, however, resist the temptation of the outlandish and the reality-rendering of sci-fi. Instead, transit and visitation dominate the themes of the book as they have of all great myth-making.

. . .

In “Mermaids,” a mother warns her child that the pressure of swimming too deep is a warning “from our grieving ancestors.” The child does not believe her and feels a kinship with mermaids for whom “the lure of the unknown was a force they just couldn’t resist.” These poems are constantly on the brink, making contact with the infinite and, just as frequently, with los—a real and assumed part of being in the world. The tragedies here are near at hand: a brother, a childhood friend, a classmate needled and marginalized by her peers.

You sense in reading Emma R. Wilson’s poems that almost anything can happen in them and be completely believable. They introduce a new kind of space-age, pop-culture carnivalesque. Her “Carnival of Everlasting Light” ends “You gotta promise not to tell,” a warning, a mark of the forbidden and the unbidden (as a dream). But who can resist the telling of having seen “glowing pregnant women clutch at the small of their backs and smile, like sunshine through honey”? Who can resist telling about such glories in these poems?

~Stephen Frech

About the Author

Emma R. Wilson was born in Virginia, but was raised on a farm in central Illinois. She has been writing for as long as she can remember. She writes fiction and poetry and is currently working on her bachelor's degree in creative writing from Millikin University. Emma likes to spend her free time outdoors and is inspired by astronomy and good poetry. She plans to continue writing until the day she dies.

 

About the Artist

Jess Black was born in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, in 1990 and currently lives and works out of a home studio in Springfield, Illinois. She received a bachelor of fine arts from Millikin University in 2012, and has since gone on to participate in a number of exhibitions as a member of The Pharmacy, a community-based artist collective.

5The artist's statement:

While conceiving the artwork for Map to the Multiverse I aimed to complement the ethereal, cosmic air it presents. Appropriately enough, I was immersed in the ideology and significance of sacred geometry at the time this collaboration came about. Its themes of oneness and the inseparable relationship of the part to the whole were influences on my illustrations.

Sacred geometry suggests an intricate cosmic structure (the flower of life) that lays claim to the pattern of creation. My fascination with this geometric concept is reflected in the chapbook through the use of Metatron's Cube and the Platonic solids.

On the cover, Metatrn's Cube is displayed, which is one of the most basic creation patterns in existence. Within the pages of Map to the Multiverse, there are five unique shapes: the dodecahedron, tetrahedron, octahedron, icosahedron, and hexahedron. Each of these shapes exists within Metatron's Cube.

Each individual image represents an interpretive and narrative perspective on the internal struggle each Platonic solid feels towards its place of origin. The open hatch reveals a dark abyss, which ties into both the cosmic significance and keen sense of wonder I felt throughout Map to the Multiverse.

~Jess Black

 

 


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